The Fellowship

"The Lord is as a man of war (warrior)" (Exodus 15:3)

"It is better therefore that two should be together, than one: for they have the advantage of their society: If one fall he shall be supported by the other: woe to him that is alone, for when he falleth, he hath none to lift him up." (Ecclesiastes 4:9-10)

The Knights of the Cross follows the ancient path of Catholic spiritual chivalry.  This path is a brotherhood of men linked by a common thread that hearkens back to the days of the Crusaders, when St. Bernard of Clairvaux exhorted the Knights Templar to be spiritual warriors for Christ and to undertake all their actions in the light of spiritual contemplation.

The Knights form a golden circle of brethren who work together, praying for and helping one another in spiritual communion, silently and in solitude.

As we Quest for the kingdom of God, we are brought together into fellowship with real and earthly Christians like ourselves struggling to "fight the good fight" and win the noble knightly crown.

"Iron sharpeneth iron, so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his friend." (Proverbs 27:17)

The Knights of the Cross makes no pretensions to being a regular order of chivalry, ancient or modern.  It follows the path of spiritual chivalry, an inner nobility of the heart.

Spiritual chivalry is not the chivalry of the past.  It glorifies God, not oneself.  It does not concern itself with gathering honors and titles, fancy uniforms or decorations.

In medieval times of feudal kingdoms, only the aristocracy could become knights; in contrast, spiritual knighthood is open to any Catholic who opens their hearts and strives to live according to Christian knightly truth and virtue.

"A faithful friend is a strong defence: and he that hath found him, hath found a treasure.  Nothing can be compared to a faithful friend, and no weight of gold and silver is able to countervail the goodness of his fidelity.   A faithful friend is the medicine of life and immortality: and they that fear the Lord, shall find him." (Ecclesiasticus 6:14-16)